4 MAY 1923, Page 16

BOOKS.

THIS WEEK'S BOOKS,

AGAIN this week there is a large number of books, but only a few of special interest. Old Dutch Pottery and Tiles, by Mr. Bernard Rackham, the Deputy-Keeper of Ceramics at the Victoria and Albert Museum, published by Messrs. Benn Brothers, is a well-produced book with very beautiful illustrations (some of them in colours) which will delight all who are interested in pottery;. and another attractive art book is Leonardo da Vinci, Sculptor, by Sir Theodore Cook, published by Mr. Arthur Humphreys.

Memories of the Nineteenth Century, by the Earl of Meath (John Murray), tells of diplomatic and other activities in Europe, America and Palestine. Among other matters, Lord Meath's reminiscences' of Berlin during the Franco- Prussian War and Paris just after it promise some interest- ing reading. Principles of English Prosody (Part I. The Elements)-is a title which will repel the less serious-minded ; but in the hands of Mr. Lasoelles Abercrombie the subject will .ceitainly be treated vigorously and without pedantry. It is as unusual as it is gratifying to have the subject treated by a poet. The book is published by Mr: Seeker. In a new book of essays by Mr. Aldons Huxley, and published by Chatto and Windus—On the Margin is the title—there will certainly be good reading. The titles of some of the essays are promising : "Subject-Matter of Poetry," "Pleasures," "Beauty in 1920," "The Author of Eminent Victorians," "Chaucer."

The third volume O&M. Camille Flammarion's Death and its Mystery, entitled After Death (T. Fisher Unwin), appears this week, and also a new book by M. Cone, My Method (Heinemann). Those who have enjoyed the works of the immortal Fabre will not need to have a translation, with the title The Wonder Book of Chemistry, recommended to them. This, too, is published by Mr. Fisher Unwin.

Travels and Sketches (Chatto and Windus), from the Danish of the great archaelogist, Frederik Poulsen, includes articles on Denmark, Italy, Hellas and Constantinople. Another exotic work is Mr. Douglas Jardine's book on The Mad Mullah of Somaliland (Herbert Jenkins). Mr. Jardine was Secretary to the Administration of Somaliland from 1916- 1921, and should therefore speak with authority.

Mr. John Murray publishes Miss Elizabeth Haldane's The British Nurse in Peace and War. Miss Haldane is an expert, and her book should be a valuable contribution to the subject.

A new novel by Mr. F. M. Ford (Ford Madox Hueffer) is always an interesting event. His latest, The Marsden Case, is published by Messrs. Duckworth. The Cream of the Jest (The Bodley Head) is an early work of Mr. James Branch Cabeil, the American novelist, whose Jurgen produced such s, conflict of opinion both here and in America.

THEE LITERARY EDITOR.