11 JUNE 1920

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In the House of Commons on Friday week the Labour

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Party attacked the new Rent Restriction Bill, but the measure was read a second time by 146 votes to 19. It is strange that trade unionists whose wages have been more than...

NEWS OF THE WEEK.

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M R. LLOYD GEORGE and other Ministers again received the Bolshevik Krassin in conference at Downing Street on Monday. Later in the evening the Prime Minister was invited to...

The Honours list published on the King's Birthday at the

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end of last week was chiefly notable for the revival of the historic title of Duke of York in favour of the King's second son, Prince Albert. The King himself long held that...

The Supreme Court of the United States has this week

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decided in favour of the constitutionality of the Federal Prohibition Amendment, and of the accompanying Volstead Enforcement Bill, which takes from the individual States the...

The Hungarian delegates signed the Peace Treaty in Paris on

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Friday week. But the International Federation of Trades Unions intends, if it can, to levy war on its own account against Hungary. The British official representatives at...

Although the full results of the elections for the new

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German Reichstag are not available at the time of writing, it is clear that the existing Government has not obtained what in the British House of Commons would be called a...

Signor Nitti, the Italian Premier, who had again taken office

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after his defeat and resignation on May 11th, resigned once more on Wednesday. His proposal to reduce the bread subsidy by raising the price of the loaf had excited hostility,...

*** The Editor cannot accept responsibility for any articles or

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letters submitted to him, but when stamped and addressed envelopes are sent he will do his best to return contributions in case of rejection.

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Mr. J. H. Thomas, M.P., addressing a mass meeting of

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London railwaymen on Sunday, expressed the opinion that " the increase just awarded was the maximum amount, not only that could be obtained now, but the maximum obtainable." He...

In a letter published in the Times of June 4th

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Sir Frederick Banbury describes the fate of an attempt made by some railway workers at King's Cross to prevent the dispatch of munitions for Poland. These men refused to handle...

The Agriculture •Bill was read a second time 'in the

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House of Commons on Wednesday, after two days' debate. The Bill 'naturally excited much criticism, but the closure was carried by 190 votes to 42, and no one challenged a...

Mr. Chamberlain informed the House of Commons on Monday that

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the Government had rejected the proposal to make a capital levy on " war wealth." On Tuesday, when the Labour Party chal- lenged the decision, the Chancellor said that he had...

A Guards Division could be much more than doubled on

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mobilization. To us it seems positively insane to propose to spend three millions on red cloth and then destroy two such fine regiments with such fine traditions as the Irish...

Mr. Chamberlain went on to remind the House that trade

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needed much more capital than before the war, and that at such a time we could not "lightly play hazardous experiments." The mere threat of a levy had almost produced a panic....

On Tuesday the Secretary for War made a. statement in

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the House of Commons in reply to numerous questions dealing with the proposed introduction of pre-war uniforms for the Regular Army. During the current financial year it is...

Yesterday week the National Railway Wages Board 'issued its award

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on the claims of the railway unions for.increased wages. This award was practically unanimous, the only dissen- tient amongst the thirteen members of the Board being Mr. Donald...

We rejoice to record the success of the protests that

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have been raised against the proposal to extinguish the Irish Guards and the Welsh Guards, or else to merge them with the Scots Guards In a composite third Regiment of Foot...

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The trade returns for May are encouraging. The exports, valued

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at £119,000,000, show an increase of £13,000,000 over April, whereas the imports, valued at £06,000,000, are nearly a million less, and the re-exports, valued at £20,000,000,...

The deforcement of an armed guard in Dublin by a

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party of Sinn. Feiners has found a speedy parallel in County Cork. A cyclist patrol of eleven soldiers, guided by a policeman, was approaching the village of Carrigtohill at 10...

Before we leave this part of the subject we must

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reiterate our warnings as to the dangers of conspiracy bunting and of giving any encouragement to persecution by prejudice. It is sure to defeat itself. Look at what happened in...

We publish elsewhere a very interesting communication from Mr. Lucien

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Wolf in which he seeks to prove that the pamphlet entitled The Jewish Peril was a forgery produced and put forth by Russian anti-Semites in order to raise an unjust and cruel...

But even if that is true, not all Jews, nor

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even a large number of Jews, but only a few Jews were and are connected with what Disraeli called these unhallowed Societies: Indeed, if we may hazard a guess on the whole...

On June 3rd Mr. Lloyd George received a deputation from

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the N.U.R. with reference to the refusal of the. Irish railwaymen to handle munitions at North Wall. Mr. J. H. Thomas, who heeded the deputation, said that his Executive, before...

As we have said before, though we must deplore the

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publi - cation of The Jewish Peril. pamphlet, and though we feel that it is by no means impossible, as Mr. Lucien Wolf suggests, that the pamphlet is a piece of the worst typo...

Bank rate,7 per cent.,ehanged from 6 per cent.Apr. 15,1920. 5

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per cent. War Loan was on Thursday, 851; Thursday week, RC a year ago, 94k,

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TOPICS OF THE DAY.

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31R. LLOYD GEORGE AND THE BOLSHEVIKS. T HE Prime Minister's new Russian policy, which he expounded in the House of Commons on Monday, is sound enough in principle. That British...

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THE BRITISH CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE AND THE STOP-SPENDING MOVEMENT.

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W E note with great satisfaction that the Associa- tion of British Chambers of Commerce is taking up and supporting, in no half-hearted manner, the move- ment for the reduction...

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DISRAELI ON THE SECRET SOCIETIES AND THE JEWS.—II.

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I T will be seen from the passages quoted by us last week, 1- and indeed from the whole of Disraeli's writings, that he considers, like every Jewish politician, and probably...

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A WORKING ELDORADO.

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[ComsfUNICATED.] C ROSSING the. Atlantic last February, I fell in with a number of Americans on their way home from every quarter of the Old World, where they had been seeking...

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BECOMING " COMMON "

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W HEN great dressmakers tell their fine customers that a particular style of dress is now " out of fashion " they slo not mean that it is now rarely seen but that it is seen...

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Y OUR readers, particularly your Red Cross readers, will remember your

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leading article of October 11th, in which you expressed in words the feeling which is at the back of the minds of all women who work for the Red Cross Society: " We want every...

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FINANCE—PUBLIC AND PRIVATE.

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(To THE EDITOR OY THE " SPECILT01."] SIR,—Although the decision of the Government not to proceed with the Levy on War Wealth on the basis of the proposal of the Board of Inland...

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CORRESPONDENCE.

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THE JEWISH PERIL. (To THE EDIPOB or THE " SPECTATOEP."] Sue—The solemn wagging of heads in certain eminent newspaper offices over the anonymous pamphlet which calls itself The...

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

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[Letters of the length of one of our leading paragraphs are often more read, and therefore more effective, than those which fill treble the space.] QUESTIONS FOR PATRIOTIC...

IRELAND AND DEVOLUTION. [TO THE EDITOR OF THE " SPECTATOR."]

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SIR,—It is just three years since writing as "an outsider e to the Spectator I strongly advocated all-round Devolution as the best and only solution of the Irish problems and...

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THE DANGER OF DISESTABLISITMENT. [To sem EDITOR or THE "

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Speoraeoe."] SIR,—Those who value the principle of Establishment, and are of opinion that the material advantages which it 'secures for the Church, important as they are, are...

SINN FEIN PROPAGANDA. .

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[To THE EDITOR OF THE " SPECTATOR.") Sat,—A good many of your correspondents have expressed from time to time surprise at the bitterness of the hatred of England displayed by...

WASTE AND THE WAR WEALTH TAX.

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[To Ts EDITOR or THE " SPECTATOR.") Sin,—Your leader with the heading " Ration the Departments " (Spectator, June 5th) is both timely-and to the point. Nothing strikes the...

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SOCIALISTS AND CO-OPERATORS.

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(To THE Entroa or Tas " SPEETAZOIL"i Sia,—The Socialists are most anxious to obtain control of the co-operative movement, and the order has gone forth to all sections of the...

DIVORCE COURTS.

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[To rat Emmy or ere " Sererrroa."] Sin,—Your correspondent Mr. Lawrence seems to think that his superior judgment is decisive without facts or arguments in reply to Mr. Barker...

THE FUTURE OF THE UNIONIST PASTY.

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(To TWA Benoit or rue. '• 9e erases."] Sia,—Colonel Reid may be right or wrong in hie prophecy, but I think ha overlooks- a. fact, pretty well known, I believe, in...

(To THE Emilie or rim "Seeceraoa "1

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Sue--Considerable comment might be made on the egret "farm** in Sind, as described by your anonymous corre- spondent, who, it may safely he said, has not much acquaint- ance...

THE PLUMAGE BILL.

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[To Tax EDITOR or THE "SeitcrAxaa."1 Sur., — I beg your indulgence to answer the two letters defending the plumage trade which appeared in your last issue. First of ail, the...

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STRAW IN BRICKS.

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[To THE EDITOR OF THE " SPECTATOR."' Sia,—There seems to be some uncertainty among your corre- spondents as to how straw is used in making bricks. In the Argentine all bricks...

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT, THE KAISER, AND ALGECIRAS. ITO THE EDITOR OF

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THE " SPECTATOR."] Sia,—There appears to be a mis-statement of really historic interest in Mr. Thayer's life of Roosevelt, which you reviewed last week. Your reviewer writes: "...

CANON RAWNSLEY AND - THE TAKES. [To THE EDITOR or THE

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" SPECTATOR."] Sia,—In your " News of the Week " note on Canon Rawnsley last week you make a strange mistake (hut it is probably due to a printer's omission) when you say : "He...

THE IDEA OF PROGRESS.

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[To THE EDITOR or THE "SPECTATOR."] SIR,—Is it not a remarkable tribute to the continued improve- ment in the conditions of life which characterized the nine- teenth century...

MAULE'S JUDGMENT.

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[To THE EDITOR OF THE " SPECTATOR."' SIR,—In your issue of May 15th you published Mr. Justice Manle's address to a prisoner who had been convicted of bigamy, words which...

[To THE EDITOR Of THE " SPECTATOR "]

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Sip,—Dean Inge's view of the progress or otherwise of humanity is robbed of its value by reason of its limited scope. When anthropologists need 700.000 years, or much longer, to...

BLIND BABIES.

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[To THE EDITOR OF THE " SPECTATOR."] SIR, —This is the month of roses and of perfection in most of the beauties of nature which charm the eye. Since I was a boy I have shared...

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SUGGESTIVE NAMES IN FICTION. [To THE EDITOR OF THE "

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SPECTATOR."] Srs,—A correspondent of yours writes of " Dr. Pillgrave " in Trollope's novels as a " happy invention." So I thought it until I came across it in Lytton's Eugene...

THE LOUTH FLOOD.

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[To THE EDITOR or THE " SPECTATOR."] Sin,—With regard to your paragraph in the issue of June 5th on the Louth disaster, and your reference to Charles Reade and to George Eliot,...

THANKS.

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[TO THE EDITOR or THE " SPECTATOR."] Szz,—Can you spare space for this note on a " thankful" dog ? A few years ago I had a most intelligent fox-terrier, who slept in a basket...

THE BUZZARD.

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[To THE EDITOR or THE " SPECTATOR. "1 Sia,—Mr. Vaughan, in his interesting letter published in the Spectator on May 29th, considers that I "take an over-pessi- mistic view of...

POETRY.

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IN THE VALLEY. HEATHER and potentilla fold The rocks with purple and with gold; The burn beneath sings clear and cold. Here man and woman kept a tryst; Here often met; here...

M US I C.

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THE GLASTONBURY FESTIVAL PLAYERS IN LONDON. PROSE who in past years have enjoyed the music dramas at Glastonbury may have sometimes wondered how the works performed there would...

ght *perlator

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TERMS OP SUBSCRIPTION. Including postage to any part of the Yearly. United Kingdom £2 1 2 OVERSEAS POSTAGE. Including postage to any of the British Dominions and Colonies and...

NOTICE.—When " Correspondence or Articles are signed with the writer's

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name or initials, or with a pseudonym, or are marked " Communicated," the Editor must not necessarily be held to be in agreement with the views therein expressed or with the...

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BOOKS.

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INDIA AT THE DEATH OF AKBAR.* THE mediaeval belief in the wealth of the Indies served a useful purpose in stimulating hardy mariners to go westward across the Atlantio and...

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THE LOLLARD BIBLE.*

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Miss DEANZSLY'e masterly treatise on the use of the Bible in the middle ages, and the Wyoliffite versions in particular, is an illustration of the way in which knowledge is...

THE IDEA OF PROGRESS.*

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" IT is incomprehensible to me," says Mr. Chesterton, " that any thinker can calmly call himself a modernist ; he might as well call himself a Thursdayite." It was an effective...

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THE HARVEST OF THE SEA.*

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" Ali adequate knowledge of the sea fisheries can only be obtained in one place, and that is at sea." But the average landsman can certainly obtain, if not an adequate, at least...

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TWO CENTURIES OF LIFE IN DOWN.t

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ALTHOUGH Mr. Stevenson's work is intended primarily for Ulstermen, it contains much which will appeal to a wider circle of readers. The material upon which it is based is almost...

CHRISTIAN FREEDOM.*

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IN one of the wisest of his Moral and Religious Aphorisms— which, like many of the best books, is out of print, and ought to be reprinted—Whicheote urges upon his generation...

ALBANIA, PAST AND PRESENT.*

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Tars is the first book on Albania by an Albanian which has been written in English. Mr. Chekrezi, an Albanian journalist, was appointed Interpreter and afterwards Secretary to...

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READABLE NOVELS.—The Lost Mr. Listtluvaite. By J. S. Fletcher. (Hodder

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and Stoughton. 7s. 6d. net.)—An amusing story of the disappearance of the hero's elderly uncle, who is well known for his antiquarian tastes. In the end the old gentleman is...

A Remedy Against Sin. By W. B. Maxwell. (Hutchinson. 8s.

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6d. net.)—It is impossible for the reader to fail to know that Mr. Maxwell in this book is preaching the case for Reform of the Divorce Laws. The ingenuity with which Roddy, the...

POETS AND POETRY.

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CONVENTIONS.* Dam amphibious style, the book which is half in verse half in prose both literally and in spirit will always be attractive to the writer. He can suit his style to...

FICTION.

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JOHN FTTZHENRY t OUR chief complaint with Miss McMahon is that she has indulged too much in pattern-making in an otherwise interesting and well- written novel. The contrasts...

MR. WELLS'S OUTLII\TE OF HISTORY.*

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We must congratulate Mr. Wells on the first half of his sketch of world-histcry, which ends with the fall of Rome and the rise of Christianity. It is a spirited and thoughtful...

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The Anglo-French Review for June opens with a spiritedartiole by

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Professor Phillimore on " Disarming Germany—in Britain," in which he urges that the reviving activities of Germany's friends should be countered by " a closer communication...

The Geographical Journal for June contains the concluding part of

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an important address by the Spanish Ambassador on Spanish Morocco, the recent progress of which appears to have been rapid and substantial. Senor Merry del Val took the...

SOME BOOKS OF THE WEEK.

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Wohoutn Nis wham does not neoossorilylwodudo swherqutnt review Recreation. By Lord Grey of Fallodon. (Constable. 2s. 6d. net.) —This charming address, delivered at the Harvard...

The Garden that We Made. By the Crown Princess of

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Sweden. (The Girl's Own Paper. 10s. 8d.)—The English Princess carried with her to Sweden our love of garden making, and finding an opportunity at the old Castle which was among...

Poem Weimar OF CONSEDERATIoN.—Peseenger. By Helen Dircks. (Chatto and Windus.

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3s. ed. net.)—Poenta. By Alec de Condole. (Cambridge University Press. 4e. 6d. net.)—Poems —chiefly religious—by a young soldier killed in the war.— Poems. By Charles Rezaikoff....

My Three Years in America. By Count Ben:eater& (Skeffing- ton.

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25s. net.)—As a pendant to Mr. Gerard's reminiscences of the American Embassy in Berlin during the war, Count Bernstorff's account of his work as German Ambassador at Washington...

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The first annual report of the London Council of Social

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Service, at 27 Heath Street, Hampstead, shows that in twenty-five of the sixty-nine boroughs and urban districts of Greater London something has been done towards the...

Grain and Chaff from an English Manor. By Arthur H.

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Savory. (Oxford : Blackwell. 21s. net.)—In this charming book Mr. Savory sets down his reminiscences of a farmer's life at Aldington in the Vale of Evesham. It is a village...

A War Minister and his Work. By General von Stein.

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(Skeff- ington. 16s. net.)—General von Stein was the Prussian War Minister from October, 1916, to near the end of the war. He had commanded the 14th Reserve Corps which bore the...

The Fifty-First Annual Co-operative Congress, 1919. ;Manchester: Co-operative Union.)—This formidable

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volume, issued in time for the Bristol Congress, gives as usual much information about the co-operative movement. Thus the retail distributive societies on .1918 paid over two...

The Victoria and Albert Museum has published a document which

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throws light on the mysterious and venerated Chippendale. This is the Accounts of Chippendale, Haig & Co. for the Furnishing of David Garrick's House in the Adelphi, given to...