4 MAY 1923

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NEWS OF THE WEEK.

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. 1 A iL T last Germany has spontaneously made an offer °Preparations. We cannot call it a good one, but as it undoubtedly offers several hopeful opportunities for negotiation...

Although information is scanty there is evidently another hitch at

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Lausanne. It is reported that France has sent a Note to the Turkish Government declaring that, unless the Turkish troops which have been concen- trated on the Syrian frontier...

In spite of these drawbacks we cannot read the text

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of the German offer without feeling that it means that German - c knows she has got to pay and wants to pay. The document is, indeed, almost pathetic. It has the note rather of...

Mr. Asquith viewed the proposal with "grave appre- hension on

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both strategic and financial grounds." We do not profess to be able to say offhand whether this new plan of making a strategic centre of the Far East, for that is what it...

On Tuesday, in the House of Commons, the Naval Estimates

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were discussed in Committee, and the debate turned on the proposal to fortify Singapore Harbour at a cost of /10,000,000. The Labour Party, and the Liberal Members to an only...

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The Select Committee to inquire into the proposed Betting Tax

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.has been appointed. It consists of nineteen members, of whom eleven are Unionists, four Labour, two Independent Liberals, and two National Liberals. Mr. Cautley, K.C., the...

Mr. Lloyd George's speech at Manchester on Saturday might almost

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have been a parody of his own oratorical style. A cynical Unionist - ..would, we imagine, have drawn -up just such a peroration as this if he had wished to revive the echoes of...

The United States Supreme Court has come to a decision

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about vessels .carrying liquor into American ports which threatens to have curious results. The Eighteenth Amendment and the Aro'stead Act are now interpreted as excluding all...

Since the Armistice £135,000,000 has been spent on Mesopotamia. The

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average citizen, who has probably not the faintest idea what we have been doing there, is just as ignorant of what it has cost him. Otherwise he would probably have complained...

'The new Income'. Tax Assessments under Schedule A, and for

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Inhabited House Duty all over the country (except in the London County Council area), are causing surprise and distress. It is thirteen years since there was a revaluation, and...

So many important questions in connexion with the court's decisions

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were left unanswered that diplomatic negotiation seems inevitable. Nothing was said, for instance, about the legal conflicts involved in the case of vessels belonging to nations...

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The main object, therefore, as the Committee in effect points

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out, is in the altered circumstances to avoid cumbering the decks with an enormous number of boats and to have, in addition to a moderate number of life- boats, light rafts...

Mr. De Valera has produced a masterpiece of casuistry of

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which any mediaeval lawyer might be proud. His proclamation of suggested terms, which- was published last Saturday, is- a crowning triumph of unintelligibility. The terms are...

There, is no parallel to what happened at the Wembley

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Stadium when the Cup Final Tie was played last Saturday. The least exciting part of the enter- tainment was that the Bolton Wanderers beat West Ham by two goals to nil. The real...

Although much blame has been distributed as a result of

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this affair, we are ourselves inclined to find in it all something rather gratifying and encouraging. To begin with, enormous numbers evidently found it possible , within a...

In any other country the angry or deluded people would

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have wanted to "get back" on Authority. They would have attacked the police as the symbols of Authority, and when a policeman or two had been mauled the police as a body would...

The invaders were far too many for the space inside -

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the Stadium and overflowed on to the ground. Long after the game was due to begin it was almost impossible to see the grass for the people. It looked for some time as though the...

The Merchant - Shipping Advisory Committee, which was appointed by

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the Board of Trade, has issued a report on the rules as to life-saving appliances in passenger ships. The rules as they stand were drawn up after the loss of the Titanic,' and...

Bank Rate, 8 per cent., changed from 81- per cent.

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July 13, 1922 ; 5 per cent. War Loan was on Thursday s 101; Thursday week, 101k; a year ago, 99i.

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TOPICS OF THE DAY.

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THE PROBLEM OF KENYA. T HERE is no more perplexing problem for the politician than a Colony with a mixed population. It often happens that the white rulers would be turned into...

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A ND now what, in barest outline, are the main, the

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special features of the new era, in which Conservatism must play a constructive part or perish ? There are two on which attention must be concentrated, because in importance, in...

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THE GERMAN OFFER

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L ORD CURZON'S speech has had the result it deserved. He appealed to Germany to try to stave off the disaster with which Europe is threatened by making a spontaneous offer to...

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MAY 7TH, 1915.

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I N New York during the weeks preceding the last voyage of the Lusitania ' there was much gossip of submarines. It was freely stated and generally believed that a special effort...

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When the League of Nations controversy raged in its full

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fury after President Wilson's return from Europe in 1919, one of the reasons most commonly given for the unpopularity of the Covenant in the United States, and especially in...

THE

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ENGLISH-SPEAKING WORLD. By EVELYN WRENCH. .ORD ROBERT CECIL sailed from New York last 4 Saturday on the conclusion of his tour in the interests of the League of Nations, and...

Mr. E. S. Martin, whose editorial page in Life is

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always so well worth reading, deals in the last issue to hand with America's attitude towards the League. He refers to the recent utterances of Senator Pepper, who told a...

Whatever the cause, whether it is in part due to

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Lord Robert's visit or to other reasons, the New York Literary Digest states that it "gathers from Republican, Demo- cratic and independent editorial utterances throughout the...

the English-Speaking Union and the Spectator for the Page Memorial

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Fund :- FOURTEENTH LIST OF DONATIONS. I E. d. A a. d. Colonel J. M. Hunt .. 2 2 0 Mr. Ben Greet .. 1 1 0 Mr. and Mrs. Frederick The Rev. R. E. Carter 0 13 0 C. Horner 2 0 0...

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How Australia deals with the fomenters of rebellion ivithin the

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borders of the British Commonwealth is demonstrated by a cable in the Times from Melbourne. The Irish Republican envoys met with a very cold reception In Victoria. In New South...

It is not only in Great Britain that problems of

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birth control are forcing themselves on public attention. Stead's Review, Professor Meredith Atkinson's interesting fortnightly magazine published in Melbourne, records the...

Details of the work of the International Magna Charts, Day

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Association are sent to me by the indefatigable founder of the Society, Mr. J. W. Hamilton, of 147 Kent Street, St. Paul, Minn. The idea of emphasizing the importance of a...

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

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AMERICA AND ENGLAND: AN EXCHANGE OF VIEWS. [To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] Sm,—Although I do not meet the requirements of your correspondent Lieut.-Col. H. W. Kettlewell, I...

A correspondent sends me the following :—A most effective contribution

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to the establishment of the ideal of the English-Speaking Union in the minds of Englishmen pf the future has been made by Lord Lee of Fareham, President of the Couheil of...

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"THE NEW LEVIATHAN."

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[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] SIR,—I am glad that you have drawn attention to Signor Mussolini's remarkable article in which ideas, now nebulous but assuming shape, are...

THE DOUBLE INCOME TAX ON FREE STATE INVESTMENTS.

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[To the Editor of the SeEcrATort.1 Sm,—President Cosgrove, speaking in the Dail, stated that, on the supposition that Income Tax in England would be 4s. in the pound and in...

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THE DEMAND FOR SMALL 'LOUSES.

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[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] Sta,—May I say a word as regards housing on behalf of newly- married couples and older couples whose children are all out in the world ? It is...

[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] SIR,—Is Mr. Chamberlain to

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come to grief over his Housing Bill because every family is not exactly like each other family ? Are all to have several children who require a quiet room to study in, a granny...

PRAYER BOOK REVISION.

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[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] Sta,—I should not presume to argue w(th the Liberal Churchman whose letter you print in'your issue of April 21st. So far as I understand the...

A PLEA FOR THE LARGE FAMILY.

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[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] Sin,—So many letters and articles have been written on the subject of Birth Control that any further correspondence seems superfluous. But...

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A FRENCH HOLIDAY COURSE.

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[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] Sin,—Last year, in the Long Vacation, my son attended a course in French Language and Literature at the University of Clermont, the advantages...

THE REV. JOSEPH TOWNSEND.

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[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] S112,—I feel impelled to take up the cudgels on behalf of the memory of the Rev. Joseph Townsend, which you so maltreated in your review of Mr....

THE OPPORTUNITY OF THE CONSERVATIVE PARTY.

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[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] Sta,—I entirely agree with the very able article on this subject in the current number of the Spectator, except that in my opinion there is a...

NO POC KE TS.

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[To the Editor of the SPEcTATott.] Sra,—Some time ago there was an article on "Pockets," in which the writer says that "the desire to have one hand occupied, to have something...

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[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] Sin,—! SIR greatly interested

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in the letter of G. McDougall from S. Rhodesia, speaking of his child aged 2i years being able to pick out unerringly gramophone records from sight, naturally before he can...

[To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] Sra,—A nephew of my

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own before he could read was able to tell at a glance the pin-prick records of a large musical-box, losing the faculty when he was able to read. I am now acquainted with a...

THE FAIR.

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Tan fair is a fight ; some are lighting for gain ; Some fighting for pleasure and some to cheat pain ; But that squinting old hag, with a voice like a knife Mid a tray of wire...

THE THEATRE.

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R.U.R." AT ST. MARTIN'S. R.U.R. can hardly be better described than by its own sub- title, "A Fantastic Melodrama." Here and there the fact of its projection into the future,...

THE CHILD AND THE GRAMOPHONE RECORDS.

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1 To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] was interested to read the letter from G. McDougall in your issue of April 28th, for my son showed a similar power of picking out records when...

POETRY.

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iJORNING : FROM THE HILLS. THE flaming life of Love divine, Whose earthly ensign is the Sun, Brings at this hour His bread and wine. For lifted hearts to feed thereon. Like...

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THE CINEMA.

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FILMS OF THE FUTURE. PROPHECY IS as out-of-place in the Cinema as permanent values. It would be as vain to try to determine what new kinds of films will be produced five years...

BOOKS.

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THIS WEEK'S BOOKS, AGAIN this week there is a large number of books, but only a few of special interest. Old Dutch Pottery and Tiles, by Mr. Bernard Rackham, the Deputy-Keeper...

(The usual "Recreations of London" will be found on p.

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7C8.)

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ENGLAND AFTER WAR.*

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wao ean say if this is a good book or a bad ? Who, peering into a looking-glass, can say if it reflects truly ? For we only know ourselves by looking-glasses. Mr. Masterman sets...

Page 18

A POET IN A CARGO STEAMER.*

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WHEN a poet writes in prose he disrobes and wears a lounge suit like the rest of us. We can see how he bears himself in ordinary life, we can examine him by intelligence tests,...

THE CONTROL OF INDITSTRY.*

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Tun simple manufacturerovhen he discovers how scientifically his industry is dissected by the modern economist, might well emulate the astonishment felt by M. Jourdain when he...

Page 19

THE SHAKESPEARE COMMEMORATION.

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THE tercentenary of the publication of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays has been fittingly celebrated by the appearance of the first two volumes of a singularly beautiful...

Page 21

ROSE-COLOURED SPECTACLES.*

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&warm* speaking, it was the Second Revolution Mr. Williams observed, as he did not arrive in Russia till June, 1917. He was one of a delegation bringing appropriate messages...

SOLDIER V. CIVILIAN.t MAJOR-GENERAL SIR FREDERICK MAURICE in his preface

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to this diary quotes one of the entries as the reason for its publication :— " The only way to stop war is to tell these facts in the school history books and cut out the rot...

Page 22

BLACK OXEN.*

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Tins is a monkey-gland story. The heroine recovers her youth in Vienna with quite incredible success ; and, by com- bining an almost girlish beauty with the experience of sixty...

Our Earth Here. By Dolf Wyllarde. (Hutchinson. 7s. 6d. net.)

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Some twenty short stories of " life " (particularly of the passion by moonlight type) in the West Indies, Aden, Devon and elsewhere. In the stories of remoter setting Miss...

The reprint of a sententious story, well padded with wads

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of moonlight and magnolia, oxide of chromium, pretty acts of charity and queer aesthetics. A poet (who describes poetry as "perfecting the expression of ideas by putting them...

FICTION.

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DRAWING ON CAPITAL.* Thu eighth layer of the earth (Rosicrucians held) preserves in type all flowers and animals that become distinct in species and everything that man shapes...

In spite of the constant references of the American publishers

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to Miss Edna Ferber's short stories being comparable to those of 0. Henry, the appreciative reader of her long novel, The Girls, will open her present volume with hesitation. It...

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Specification. (Technical Journals, Ltd. 103. 6d.) Specification has made its

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twenty-fifth annual appearance, and is prefaced by a congratulatory letter from the President of the Royal Institute of British Architects. It is meet that the profession should...

None-Go-By. By Mrs. Alfred Sidgwick. (Collins. is. 6d.)

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A comedy of a couple who seek in a Cornish cottage the peace London, full of friends and relatives, denies them. With a light and graceful touch Mrs. Sidgwick demolishes their...

A study of a dilettante American who, always intending to

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produce a work of great value in literature, dies before he gets further than his preparations. While containing several ingenious passages of literary analysis—particularly the...

WORKS OF REFERENCE.

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The fifty-third issue of " Crockford " seems to be, wherever tested, as accurate and comprehensive as ever, and we can suggest no improvement or addition. The editor's preface,...

The Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland. Vol. II.

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152942. In this massive and finely printed volume Dr. Hay Fleming has continued the work begun by Mr. Livingstone. The five thousand entries, to which there is an index of 170...

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Modern Electrical Theory : Relativity. By N. R. CampbKi.

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(Cambridge : at the University Press. 7s. 6d. net.) - This is the second monograph devoted to recent research in physics, which serves also as a supplementary chapter to Mr....

SCIENCE AND PSYCHOLOGY.

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Aspects of Science. By J. W. N. Sullivan. (Cobden-Sand3r3om. 6s. net.) Throughout the selection of his essays about science, which Mr. Sullivan has given us in this attractive...

Major-General Sir Geoffrey Twining. A Biographical Sketch by Mary Christine

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Ritchie. (Montreal : Chapman. 81.00.) Miss Ritchie has written this memoir of a distinguished Engineer officer to remind her fellow-Canadians that Sir Geoffrey Twining was a...

Great and Small Things. By Sir Ray Lankester. (Methu3n. 7s.

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6d.) The distinguished author of Science from an Easy-Chair has given us in his new book yet another collection of popular scientific articles. We always thought that in a...

BIOGRAPHIES.

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Georges Apple, Pasteur et Profes.seur en Italie et a Paris, 1827- Lack of space makes it, unfortunately, impossible for the Spectator to devote much attention to foreign...

ESSAYS.

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The Boy Bishop, and other Essays. By W. C. Haller. (T:33:L 7s. 6d.) The title essay is a very interesting account of that mediaeval Christmas ceremony, common in France and...

The Life of Lord Moulton. By H. Fletcher Moulton. (Nisbet.

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15s. net.) • Lord Birkenhead, in a preface to this memoir, says of Lord Moulton that "no man since the great Bacon has brought to the Bench so consummate a scientific...

Sir Henry Stewart Cunningham, K.C.I.E. By M. M. Verney. (John

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Murray. 103. 6d. net . .) With Miss Cunningham's help Lady Verney has compiled a memoir of Sir Henry Cunningham which will give pleasure to many who remember his peculiar charm...

Oriel is one of the oldest of Oxford colleges. Adam

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de Brome, the founder and first Provost, held office from 1826 to Ian. Moreover, Oriel in recent times has had many professional fellows. The elaborate list compiled by the late...

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On. By Hilaire Belloe. (Methuen. 6s.) Mr. Belloc's fancies are

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pleasing. But they have one great enemy, his love for logical reasoning. Because of this they often become tedious, often trivial. Fancy and precise calculation are ill-mated....

An Old Castle and other Essays. By Caleb T. Winchester.

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(Macmillan. Hs. net.) Caleb Winehester was professor of English literature in Wesleyan University, and this memorial volume reveals him as a man of wide sympathies. But he...

VARIOUS.

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FAMOUS POISON TRIAIS. By Harold Eaton. (Collins. 78. 6d. net.) Mr. Harold Eaton gives what may be called a " popular" account of five famous trials. His chapter on " The...

LIGHT FICTION.

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ELLEN OF BRINGARD. By Wilkinson Sherren. (Cecil Palmer. 7s. 6c1.) " Talk we of slaughter," says the beautiful Ellen to her Druidic father, dee., dm. 7= BEAUTY or MARTHA. By...

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FINANCE-PUBLIC & PRIVATE.

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[BY OUR CITY EDITOR.] THE POSITION OF INVESTMENT STOCKS. [To the Editor of the SPECTATOR.] SIR,—For nearly two years Stock Exchange securities have pursued an upward course,...

FINANCIAL NOTES.

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The election of Mr. Montagu Collet Norman as Governor of the Bank of England for the fourth year in succession commands approval in the City. Ilis election is, I imagine, a...

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MATERIAL REVIEW.

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THE BIRMINGHAM GUILD OF METALWORKERS. Six attractive metal trays have been sent us by the Bir- mingham Guild of Metalworkers, of Great Charles Street, Birmingham ; 28 Berners...