5 MARCH 1881, page 2

The Government Has Taken A Step Which It Will Find

very difficult to defend, It has superseded. Sir Evelyn Wood as second in command in South Africa, appointing Major-General Newdigate, who, if Sir F. Roberts is shot or falls......

In The Course Of His Speech, Sir W. Harcourt Contrasted

Mr. Dillon's manliness in reiterating, under all circumstances, the language he had once uttered, with Mr. Parnell's flight to Franco, and amidst great laughter, quoted the......

Mr. Forster, Having Gone To Dublin, To Enter On His

very unenviable respeuaibilities under the new Coercion Act, Sir William Harcourt on Tuesday moved the introduction of the Irish Disarming Bill in a apoech of too much Blimp-......

- • ----- The Debate Of Tuesday And Wednesday Resulted

in a con- siderable scene, when the discussion on the second reading of the Arms 13i11 was resumed, on Thursday, and Mr. Parnell reappeared, though he took hardly any part in......

In The House Of Lords, The Coercion Bill Led To

no division, Lord Beaconsfield giving it his support, but tracing the neces- sity of it to three causes,—a series of bad harvests, the stimulus given by the Liberal party at the......

Of Couise, This Wild Speech, Which Contained Much To Tho

same purpose, brought up Sir William Harcourt in his most triumphant and irritating mood, to presii home the argument. furnished by Mr. Dillon's speech, and to denouuce the......

Sir William Harcourt Was Asked On Tuesday, In The House

of Commons, by Mr. Schreiber, whether it were true that he bad received. a telegram, purporting to come from John Devoy, threatening him with assassination ; and if so, whether......

The Cape Government Is Evidently Determined To Have Its Own

way with the Basutos. The tribe were willing to yield to the Crown, but not to the Cape Colony, and they had reason. On the declaration of the armistice, the Colonial Ministry......