28 APRIL 1955

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TOWARDS PEACE IN THE STRAITS

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0 NLY a few weeks ago it seemed as if war might break out any minute in the Formosa Straits. Chiang Kai- shek was digging his heels in. The Communist Chinese threats to...

SPECTATOR

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ESTABLISHED 1828 No. 6618 FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1955 PRICE 7d.

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DRAGON'S TEETH

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I F skill and responsibility were the only test for worthiness to receive wage differentials, schoolmasters would be better paid than solicitors, and the curate's stipend would...

TALKS AT THE SUMMIT

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S HORTLY before he resigned, Sir Winston Churchill said that he was still in favour of four-power talks at 'the summit.' In this he differed from the official Foreign Office...

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Portrait of the Week

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A general election campaign in Britain is limited to five weeks or less, and during these weeks there is usually an atmosphere of unreality or suspense : decisions can- not be...

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Political Commentary

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By HENRY FAIRLIE S INCE 1867, when the conditions of the modern two- party system were established, no government has ev,er increased its majority at a general election. This is...

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THERE WAS much talk some weeks ago in Parliament and

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the press about restrictive trade practices. The rubber manu- facturers, it was said, formed a `ring,' and as evidence it was recalled that whenever the price of one firm's...

NO DOUBT it was embarrassing for Dr. Barnet Stross when

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at his 'roses for Lidice' press conference his Communist guests were stumped by some awkward questions put to them by a former Czech who is now a British subject working in...

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A SPECTATOR'S NOTEBOOK

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MR. WOODROW WYATT, I read, has shaken the dust of Birming- ham from his feet, with the slightly embittered comment : 'One should not expect any gratitude in politics and I...

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IN THIS COUNTRY you can say what you like, but

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you cannot listen to what you like. The case of the Army officer hauled up before the Bench the other day for the crime of listening to police-car broadcasts is illuminating....

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Cold Feet in the Cold War '

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BY DAVID ORMSBY GORE, MP I N a matter of weeks the people of West Germany will have regained their sovereignty and will have started to rearm. This will impose upon them...

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Johnson's Dictionary

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8 Y GEOFFREY TILLOTSON F OR most of us Johnson exists as he exists in the pages of Boswell's Life. In those pages he provides, of course, a magnificent spectacle. And yet...

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The Sound. Barrier

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BY ANTHONY HOWARD (President of the Oxford Union) Sunday, 'takes extreme pains to remain detached and And I suppose they would—these professional men of good will—defend its...

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City and Suburban

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By JOHN BETJEMAN D RIVING out into Ian Niall's subject during the sharp spring sunlight of last Saturday and Sunday, 1 could Government subsidy. I dare to suggest that the...

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A LAPWING'S NEST Force of habit made me watch the

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lapwings twisting and turning in the air above a crow that slowly flapped away. I used to love to find the lapwing's nest and when the crow had been driven off I could not...

Country Life

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BY IAN NIALL S OME farmers in my county have been discussing at a public meeting the question of when they have the right to shoot a dog that is worrying sheep. I suppose the...

The Dynasty of Bores

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monograph to these beings, so inscrutable, so ubiquitous, so diverse. `Nuisance (usu. as pred.); tiresome person, twaddler. [f. 1750, etym. dub; early quotations imply F....

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The other day a friend expressed astonishment that I had

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not closely observed an otter. 1 have, of course, seen an otter, but my luck with them has not been good. I have fished a great deal in lakes, and otters are more fond of...

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TWO NEW POEMS

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Usefulness of Light Stirred by the wind's long spoon the snow for one whole day spins down. The sky comes clean. Colour is here to stay. Night circles past. Again light stirs....

Meteor Stone .

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Night's flood is tar. Through its arching gulf of black, Without a moon, without a star, Floats a cloud, made out of dark : But in that chaos is the thing I seek. Blue meteor...

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SIR,—'The penalties of failure in this field are quite disproportionate

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to the chances of suc- cess: This portentous - sounding phrase ap- peared in your comments on the Budget. I am trying to find out what it means, if anything. Can one compare...

SHAW AGAINST LAWRENCE SIR,—What Mr. Coombes found on looking up

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the passages named by Mr. Rubinstein might well be all that he says. When Lawrence states that for Shaw 'fidelity is sex, and sex it fidelity' he is impugning a moral or...

Sra,—I am shocked and amazed that under the article 'Becalmed'

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on April 15 you should present a full-page advertisement to The Times. I. am totally opposed to this latest Communist-inspired strike (which fact, inci• dentally, the...

MR. BUTLER'S BUDGET SIR,—In its defence of. Mr. Butler's Budget

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proposals, your leading article contains the following sentence: 'He can point to a great increase in personal savings in support of his hope that the new tax reliefs will h i e...

99 Gower Street, London, W.C.1

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Euston 3221

Sta,—In your issue of April 8, Mr. H. F. Rubinstein

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calls Dr. Leavis's critical judge- ment that Lawrence is 'the greatest writer of the twentieth century' an 'advertiser's assur- ance.' Of course advertisers recommend the...

Letters to the Editor

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The Press Strike Meredith Whittaker Maio,: R. C. R. M. Clarke Mr. Butler's Budget John Collinson, P. M. Gedge Shaw against Lawrence Howell Evans, David Craig Fluoridation...

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THE LUSITANIA

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SIR,—I have in production a documentary book on the last voyage of the Lusitania. I would be most appreciative of any help at all you may be able to offer me in this rather...

Contemporary Arts

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TELEVISION AND RADIO Stage by Stage (TV, Sunday) ought to have been much better. I could only imagine that just before the cameras switched on Mrs. Grace Wyndham Goldic said...

THE LANDINGS AT SYRACUSE SIR,—In your issue of April 15,

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'A Spectator's Notebook' gives the impression that the land- ings near Syracuse in 1943 were American. Not for the first time in recent weeks Pharos's light has proved a danger...

FLUORIDATION SIR,—The comment by Pharos on 'compul- sory' fluoridation in

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your issue of March 18. 1955, is forthright but scarcely conclusive. He is against a 'medical experiment without [his] knowledge or consent.' An experiment? Over twenty million...

THE INVESTIGATOR

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SIR,—Far from there being a considerable black market for the records of The investiga- tor in the United States, as suggested by your contributor John Irwin, they were being...

FUNDS CONSERVATIVE

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SIR,—During the past three and a half years the present Conservative Government has not only worked for peace but, after rescuing the nation from the edge of bankruptcy, has now...

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ART

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ALAN REYNOLDS joins the ever-lengthening list of British artists who have received inter- national awards, with his appearance as one of the three prize-winners in the...

CINEMA

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THE CONSTANT HUSBAND. (London Pavilion.! —THE LAST TIME I SAW PARIS. (Empire.)— RUN FOR COVER. (GaUM0111.)—LA RAGE AU CORPS. (Curzon.) AN extremely funny film, written by Sidney...

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THE DESPERATE HOURS. By Joseph Hayes.

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(London Hippodrome.)--Kismur. (Stoll.) FROM across the Atlantic come this week's shows. I say 'shows' advisedly, for neither thriller nor musical is really theatre. The...

EDUCATION TOR THE ARMY.---In a Committee of Supply. last night,

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the Ordnance Estimates were voted. MR. HUME objected strongly to the expense of military colleges, and contended that artillery officers should educate them- selves, as other...

GRAMOPHONE RECORDS

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(RECORDING COMPANIES: C, Columbia; D, Decca; DT, Ducretet-Thomson; H, HMV; T, Telcfunken; V, Vox.) VOCAL Music—I: OPERA Verdi heads the list with four complete operas....

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CHAMBERS'S I

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JOURNAL MAY 2s. Selected from the Contents: THE REMARKABLE STORY OF HAYDN'S HEAD ROMANCE OF THE TROUT IN KENYA It is 50 years since the first consignment of ova was sent from...

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Hamilton, at 15s. ' • This year marks the centenary

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of the death of Charlotte BronW, and it is presumably a revived or increasing interest in the Brontës generally which has led to the almost simultaneous appearance of three new...

In the familiar category of reporters' novels is Troubling of

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a Star, a neat routine job, but very well done, on the Korean war. with attractive excursions to Japan : excellent on cowardice. insufficiency, matrimonial chitchat, and...

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The problem of replacement has become more acute since 1945

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owing to rapid sterling depreciation and unless reserves had been built up. the present shipbuilding liability of t 1 8.900,000 could not have been contemplated. Whilst ships...

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EMPLOYMENT BUREAU to all office staff, men and women. Typewriting.

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Dupli- cating. Stella Fisher Bureau, 15 Strand, W.C,2. TRAfaigat 91190. SOLUTION TO CROSSWORD No. 83( ACROSS : 1 Hesper. 4 Obverses. 10 PIntnner, II Gtabbed, 12 Cadet Idris....

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